Instamatic was Kodak's trademark name for their easy-load 126 cartridge film cameras, launched in February 1963 with the Instamatic 50. Later, in 1972 Kodak used the name Pocket Instamatic for some of their 110 cartridge cameras; other 110 models were branded Ektra or Ektralite, and for Super8 8mm movie cameras and projectors. Kodak 126 Instamatics were a great success and sold around 60 ...

Today a few 110 cameras are still being made, but these are all very low-cost, featureless cameras. If Kodak had decided to produce 16mm cameras instead of 110 cameras, they could have succeeded by standardizing the 16mm cassette and the submini camera might likely be the most popular format today. This list is inaccurate and incomplete. History. The 110 cartridge was introduced by Kodak in 1972 with Kodak Pocket Instamatic cameras with Kodachrome-X, Ektachrome-X, Kodacolor II, and Verichrome Pan film. The new pocket-sized cameras became immediately popular, and soon displaced competing subminiature cameras, such as the Minolta 16 series, from the market.